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Accessing the Innovation Funds

Robyn M. Bolton Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags Finance, funding, project management

Robyn M. Bolton provides a few inside tips on how to work with resource constraints and the people who control them when you need to access the resources that will fund your innovation.

 

The process of setting annual goals and budgets can be frustrating and even demoralizing for employees and managers alike as their visions and budgets get slashed in each round of management reviews.

This process can be especially painful for Innovators who feel like they are expected to do more with less and, as a result, can’t even try to do anything new or game-changing because they barely have the resources to operate the current business.

Resource constraints are a reality in every organization. The trick is not to give up when you run into them, but to figure out how to work with them and, more importantly, the people who control them.

 

The steps are:

-Acknowledge reality

-Know where there’s flexibility

-Channel your inner Mick Jagger

-Make your case

 

Read the full article, 4 Steps to Get the Resources You Need to Innovate, on LinkedIn.

When the Rubber Hits the Road

Amanda Setili Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags Agile Business, process, Strategy

Three key points in ninety seconds from Amanda Setili on how to avoid strategy execution melt down.Strategy execution is where everything goes haywire.

 

We can always come up with a good strategy, a good plan for what we want to do, but when the rubber meets the road and you’re actually implementing, that’s where you find out all the things that you maybe didn’t plan for. Frankly, it’s impossible to anticipate everything. One of the keys to effective strategy execution is having clear goals in mind, but also having people empowered to make decisions along the way because you got to enable yourself to adjust course. It used to be that you could plan strategy cycles, every five years, or at least every year. Now you need to be continuously adjusting your strategy. At least every quarter you should be having strategic discussions about what have we done so far, what have we learned, what do we want to change? That process of constantly adjusting course is essential and it’s also essential to make sure that everyone understands where you’re headed so that they can all contribute because frankly, with the speed of change today, you can’t possibly tell everyone what to do. You need to have them clear about what the goal is so that they can anticipate on their own for their own part of the business, how they need to adjust.

 

Watch the video, How to Prevent Strategy Execution Meltdowns, on Youtube.

Building Community from the Inside-out

Jennifer Levine Hartz Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags Social enterprise

Jennifer Hartz shares a story of a wise investment, socially and economically, and shows how banks and other funds can support projects like these and earn a meaningful financial return.

 

Shamrock Gardens is the brainchild of Brent Sobol.  It’s the manifestation of his career in multi-family properties and his Jesuit faith, an order of the Roman Catholic Church, established in the 1500’s.  The affordable supportive apartment complex is in one of the most challenging areas on the south side of Atlanta and is home to 900 residents – with a waiting list to get in.  Further, this is a wise investment!  Banks and other funds can support projects like these and earn a meaningful financial return.

 

Read the full article, Magic on Plaza Lane: A Lesson in Multi-Family Real Estate, on the Corporate Hartz website.

Words not to Live by

Robbie Baxter Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags personal development

In a world that has an abundance of aphorisms and rules for every occasion, Robbie Kellman Baxter suggests that the community of professionals think twice before following advice.

 

Other than maybe the golden rule, I am hard pressed to think of any saying that is always true. And that shouldn’t be surprising, as the answer to so many questions is “it depends.”

  • “Should I let my daughter go to the late night party?” It depends…on your child’s age, maturity, and where the party is being held.
  • “Should I quit this job right away or stick it out for a while?” It depends…on your other options.
  • “Is a liberal arts education the best thing ever or a waste of money?” It depends… on what you want from your education.

And yet, people still spew out these aphorisms like they are universally true and unassailable.

 

Read the full article, Nobody Ever Said “I Wish I’d Spent More Time at Work”​ on Their Deathbed …and Other Lies, on LinkedIn.

Following the Path to Innovation

Kaihan Krippendorff Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags Agile Business, disruption, employee innovation

In this TEDX talk at Columbia University, Kaihan Krippendorff discusses employee innovation within the model of disruption, and how it helps activate lean, agile innovation and growth in your organization. 

 

“Employees are the number one source of innovative growth options and the only remaining source of true competitive advantage. Arming them with the skills and tools necessary to innovate on a continual basis is of paramount importance to organizational survival.”

 

Points covered in the talk include:

-The path of the entrepreneur

-Disruptive innovation

-The innovation myth

 

Watch the Ted Talk, Change the World without Quitting Your Job, on Youtube.

Read the full article in the Change The World Without Quitting Your Job

The Constraints of Seeing Wrongly

Jason George Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags professional development

Jason George uses the examples of the stent and Ernst Haeckel’s biogenetic law to tackle the issue of “why bad practice persists even after it’s been proven incorrect” and how we can overcome common misbeliefs. 

 

Forget the lessons

For high schoolers studying biology the stakes for bad ideas may not be as high as they would be for a patient who unnecessarily undergoes a heart procedure, risking a complication that outweighs any potential benefit. But in both cases bad ideas continue to color one’s view of the world, and the consequences of seeing things wrongly leads down paths that constrain you.

Like skeuomorphs that stubbornly persist as reminders of a feature of the tangible environment that has long since ceased to be relevant, conventional wisdom guides and constrains decision making in a range of disciplines. Sometimes it channels it in directions that are flat wrong. Try three things to help break through this fog…

1. Blow up your mental model

2. Get as close to the source as you can

3. Incentivize a broader focus

 

Read the full article, When what you’ve learned holds you backon Jason’s website.