News

A Business Model for Social Enterprises

Shane Heywood Thought Leadership
February 5, 2020

 

Shane Heywood takes a look at how the Direct to Consumer business model could have meaningful implications for social enterprises. 

My earliest shaving experience was around the age of 13. After 10 minutes, reeling from irritation everywhere, and minimal hair in the sink, I also felt slightly cheated by how much I had spent on the razor.

Apparently, that feeling has helped to lead to a $1 Bn USD deal.

Across some consumer-facing industries, from shaving cream to mattresses to prescription glasses, a direct to consumer – plus (DTC+) model is leaving an indelible imprint in the Consumer Goods industry, delighting consumers and disappointing long-standing players with equal effect.

The Dollar Shaving Club, which provides members with razors and other personal care products, is one of the more prominent firms showing the DTC model; however Casper and Eve mattresses are other examples, and Warby Parker, providing glasses.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • The Direct to Consumer (DTC) business model
  • DTC and Social impact

 

Read the full article, Dollar Shaving Club and Social Enterprises: Can one learn from the other?, on Shane’s website.

tags Business Models, Social enterprise, social impact