Brand Communication

A Conversation on The Brain & Brand Connection

March 10, 2021

 

Ravi Rao recently co-hosted a webinar with Angela Thompson for the Columbus Retail Roundtable where they discussed the importance of emotional intelligence at all levels of the corporate arena.

I have a very weird background. Essentially, three chapters.  Chapter one was a decade spent in a science environment at Johns Hopkins and then Harvard, studying the brain, studying the science stuff of how the brain works, starting at the kind of individual brain cell, the neuron level up through the kind of broader structures, and about what do different parts of the brain do and how do we treat patients with diseases of the brain. That was chapter one. Chapter two was a short five years at McKinsey, so learning how to handle business challenges and use consulting services to help clients solve their problems. For five years in a variety of industries, not only retail, but then the third chapter, the one that’s lasted now for the last 15 years, is one where I, as an independent consultant focus specifically on the topic of how do organizations really work not only on the kind of broader structure process technology and talent level, but down to the individual. How do people relate to each other in this organization, how do they relate to each other on teams, how do they relate between different levels of the organization, the MID managers and the executives and the frontline but then also how to individuals within the organization have interactions with customers on the outside and that interaction and relationship basis is what we’ll talk about today, and how. Interestingly, a little bit counterintuitive for a lot of people, the brain has a big role to play and how we actually manage relationships so with that, I do have a few slides just as an introduction, but again they’re meant to be a dialogue starter, not a lecture for which you should have to take notes or anything.

 

Key points include:

  • The heart/head connection
  • How the instinct to connect is killed
  • Creating the emotional connection in retail

 

Listen to the full podcast, How Our Brains and Emotions Influence our Brand Experiences, on Community Roundtable.

 

Nailing the Tagline

 

Jonathan Paisner shares an evergreen post on what it takes to make a good tagline for your business. 

How do we capture the essence of our brand in a handful of words?

This sounds hard. That’s because it really isn’t the right question to be asking. 

Better: What brief phrase can strengthen and deepen understanding of our brand?

You can’t say it all. Don’t try.

Name, logo and tagline partner to communicate the essence of the brand. 

What you don’t want to do is say the same thing across all three assets (i.e. a company called Speed with an arrow for a logo, plus the tagline “Faster is better.”). What’s the point of that? It’s not only a missed opportunity to tell other parts of the story; it reduces the needs of your customers to single dimension – and positions you for irrelevance if and when the better mousetrap comes along. 

Your tagline does not exist in a vacuum. 

A FEW TIPS AS YOU EMBARK ON THE ROAD TO A NEW TAGLINE:

#1 Begin with a brand platform.

Creating a tagline without a strategic foundation risks internal dissent and external confusion. Know what you are trying to say before you look for memorable and meaningful ways to say it. The brand platform serves as both guide and filter to what you say and to the tone you use in expressing it. Great taglines ring true – and the platform will clarify exactly what it is you are being true to. 

 

Key points include:

  • Understanding what a tagline is and what it isn’t
  • Keeping the bigger picture in mind
  • Avoiding buzzwords

 

Read the full article, What Makes a Good Tagline, on BrandExperienced.com.

 

Brands Are People Too!

January 30, 2021

 

In this podcast, Susan Meier shares the story of her interesting journey and her strategic approach to brand alignment.

I think what’s a great thing about a liberal arts education is that perspective of try everything, see as much as you can, and then make connections between those things.  And so, I’m very much a product of that, as you pointed out, I kind of live in these two seemingly very disparate realms, but for me, in my world and my thinking, they’re actually a lot, so much crossover and they’re very related. And the ways of thinking, and even some of the tools that I use when I’m making art are very similar to when I’m leading teams through a business process. And so on the face of that it may seem very strange, but if you think about it in the context of that liberal arts perspective, it actually makes a lot of sense. 

…I guess I’m sort of hardwired in a way, which is always to be toggling back and forth between, you know, the big picture and the details; between seeing possibility, and dreaming, and imagining things, and then being very, very practical and logical. 

And so, if you look at my artwork, there’s a lot of mathematical relationships between shapes, there’s like a lot of precision, but then there’s also a lot of fluidity and looseness and unexpected elements. And I would say exactly the same things about the way I lead a project. 

 

Key points include:

  • Customer research
  • Product innovation and packaging design 
  • Working with some of the world’s leading corporations

 

Listen to the full podcast, Brands Are People Too, on the Leading From the Front podcast.

 

Does Your Brand Connect People to Product?

November 13, 2020

 

In this inspiring podcast, Susan Hamilton Meier and Ross Swan talk about how leadership sets the tone and direction of a brand. 

Branding requires leadership. One can start or have a company with great products or services and doing well in the market. But a brand can be nebulous or inconsistent and it really requires a top-down perspective to define what is it that ties all the products, the people behind it together and what the brand stands for. So that the people on the other end, who are receiving the messaging and using the products or services have a clear understanding of what and who the brand is.

A brand is a reflection of its people and the people reflect the leadership they have.

For larger companies, the challenge is that there are multiple stakeholders and brands. Which results in having a lot of things to align. When dealing with multiple people managing multiple brands, for a company, alignment is really challenging. Simply because people have different perspective.

It’s a two-fold exercise. You have leadership, you have employees which form the corporate brand, then you have product and service brands. The products and service brands have to be congruent with the corporate brand. It’s the congruence that brings about the extent of success.

 

Key points include:

  • Leadership, focus and clarity of message
  • The different branches of the brand
  • Working backwards

 

Listen to the full podcast, Leadership and the Brand Impact, on SoulInspiredLeadership.com.