Brand Management

The Key to Maximizing Brand Marketing

 

Toopan Bagchi identifies the importance of  building segmented brand management teams to maximize marketing capabilities and effectiveness.  

In a continuously disrupted landscape, many retailers are realizing the potential for private brands to not only improve margins, but to also attract customers, build baskets and drive loyalty. However, given retail’s traditional reliance on CPG companies to develop and cultivate brands, capabilities around true brand management are often limited. 

Retailers leaning in on private brands would be wise to establish and elevate brand management capabilities to improve the likelihood of success of any private brand strategy by establishing a clear and coherent brand architecture, identifying white space opportunities, developing brand platforms, creating and launching product, and sustaining brand health over time. Retailers such as Target are recognizing this and establishing brand management teams to oversee the portfolio of private brands, define strategies and lead execution.

 

Information in this article includes:

  • Picking the team
  • Setting up brand architecture
  • Launching brands

 

Read the full article, Keys to building a private brand management team, on the Storebrands website. 

 

Building Your Online Persona and Why it Matters

 

Ben Dattner and Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic explain why the opinions of others shape our personal ‘brand’ and how to shape our digital personas for the best possible results in this article published in Harvard Business Review.

Who am I, really?’

Philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists – not to mention poets and artists — have been trying to answer this question for centuries. The good news for business leaders is that they don’t need to turn into armchair psychotherapists, or get an advanced degree in metaphysics, to figure it out. Nor do average employees need to dig deep into their unconscious, or unleash their inner Freud.

In the business world, there is a far simpler way of working out who we are, at least when it comes to our professional personas: just pay attention to how others see us.

Social science research says that who we are at work is predominantly defined by what other people think of us: how they measure the success of our behaviors and actions, how they perceive our characters and motivations, and how they compare us to others. Whether we get informal advice from our peers, or partake in formal assessment-related exercises, there is no better way to pinpoint who we are at work than to crowdsource evaluations of our reputations and personal ‘brands.’

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Understanding the algorithm
  • Social media posts
  • Manipulating the algorithm

 

Read the full article and access interesting links in, How to Curate Your Digital Persona, on the Harvard Business Review website.

 

Take Two Minutes to Build Your Brand Knowledge

 

Jonathan Paisner shares his expert insights on branding in this new video series. This week, a 150-second overview of The Branded House vs. The House of Brands.

There is a little bit of brand in everything your business says and does. We’ve created this series to give you a little bit of brand thinking to inject into your business strategy, and help you make smarter decisions. So today, let’s spend the next 150 seconds talking about brand architecture.

 

Included in this video:

  • Why brand architecture matters
  • Building and extending relationships
  • Portfolio flexibility

 

Watch the full video, #be150 – Brand Architecture 101, on Vimeo.

 

How to Survive and Thrive Post COVID-19

 

In this detailed article, Surbhee Grover identifies the decision-making inputs and new market approaches that will be required to survive in the new economy.

For entrepreneurs, coming out of COVID-19 isn’t the end of a crisis. It’s the beginning of a new way of thinking about their approach to product-market fit, financing, marketing and go-to-market strategies. And for some, will be a time to reflect on their personal approach to risk. The exponential pace of change to society will mean that only those entrepreneurs who have the greatest ability to adapt will survive. 

Framing how the world will be different is important, as these differences will both unlock new opportunity and create new goalposts for innovation, user adoption (B2C and B2B), team building, product-market fit, and venture funding. We believe a few things will be true:

 

Areas covered in this article include:

  • Brand relationships
  • Purchasing behaviour
  • Migration of talent and teams
  • Re-imagined supply chains
  • Data needs and sources

 

Read the full article, Shakeout of the Entrepreneurial Ecosystem What will it take to survive? And thrive?, on LinkedIn.

 

Merging Creative and Critical Thinking

 

Susan Hamilton Meier shares her thoughts on the merger of analytical and creative thinking and the processes and tools she has designed to help teams problem-solve more creatively.

I turned up at the Boston Consulting Group, probably as the only hire who had never opened a spreadsheet before, so that was interesting, and I ended up, by virtue of that, getting assigned to projects where I did a lot more people skills, so I did a lot of interviews, I gravitated towards their consumer goods practice, and it was actually after they put me through business school, and it was actually after business school, which was around the time when companies were trying to work out what their brands meant in an online environment that I discovered the discipline of branding and that very interesting question of what your brand means. 

 

Points covered in this talk include:

  • How she became interested in branding
  • Discovering the discipline of branding online
  • Consumer research and branding
  • The driving forces behind brand loyalty

 

Listen to the full podcast, Brand Strategy with Susan Meier, on the Dream Business Radio podcast.

 

You Don’t Know the Answer ‘till You Ask the Question

February 11, 2020

 

James Black provides a comprehensive list of questions designed to help you build a marketing strategy that can help your business move forward in 2020.

Entering the New Year provides a great opportunity to take a quick audit of your brand or business to identify opportunity areas in your 1) customer understanding, 2) go to market strategy and 3) marketing capabilities. These 20 questions are designed as thought-starters to help you get a sense of the state of your business.

 

Areas covered by the questions include:

  • Brand/Business proposition
  • The path to purchase
  • Marketing plans
  • Marketing capabilities

 

Read the full article, 20 Questions to Help Your Brand or Business See 20/20 in 2020, on LinkedIn.