Brand Marketing

Nailing the Tagline

 

Jonathan Paisner shares an evergreen post on what it takes to make a good tagline for your business. 

How do we capture the essence of our brand in a handful of words?

This sounds hard. That’s because it really isn’t the right question to be asking. 

Better: What brief phrase can strengthen and deepen understanding of our brand?

You can’t say it all. Don’t try.

Name, logo and tagline partner to communicate the essence of the brand. 

What you don’t want to do is say the same thing across all three assets (i.e. a company called Speed with an arrow for a logo, plus the tagline “Faster is better.”). What’s the point of that? It’s not only a missed opportunity to tell other parts of the story; it reduces the needs of your customers to single dimension – and positions you for irrelevance if and when the better mousetrap comes along. 

Your tagline does not exist in a vacuum. 

A FEW TIPS AS YOU EMBARK ON THE ROAD TO A NEW TAGLINE:

#1 Begin with a brand platform.

Creating a tagline without a strategic foundation risks internal dissent and external confusion. Know what you are trying to say before you look for memorable and meaningful ways to say it. The brand platform serves as both guide and filter to what you say and to the tone you use in expressing it. Great taglines ring true – and the platform will clarify exactly what it is you are being true to. 

 

Key points include:

  • Understanding what a tagline is and what it isn’t
  • Keeping the bigger picture in mind
  • Avoiding buzzwords

 

Read the full article, What Makes a Good Tagline, on BrandExperienced.com.

 

Big Brands Make a Bold Move

 

In response to the recent news on how many brands approached this year’s Super Bowl ads, Jennifer Hartz shares an article that highlights corporate responsibility in action.  

Two stalwart Super Bowl brands and commercial rivals are skipping 2021 game ads.

On February 2nd, amidst a global pandemic and national division, millions will watch Super Bowl LV! The 2020 vs 2019 Champions, Kansas City Chiefs vs Tom Brady…. I mean the Tampa Bay Buccaneers…. will face off with the NFL’s first home field advantage final game.  The Super Bowl is frequently the most watched American TV broadcast of the year.

What’s the broad and enduring appeal of the Super Bowl?

For many, especially the younger generations, with ever-shrinking attention spans, football is now likely the nation’s pastime.  Average, baseball games last 3 hours and contain 18 minutes of action. Average football games last 3 hours and 15 minutes with 11 minutes of actual sporting.  So why do millions eschew the MLB and flock to the Super Bowl in person or on television or via streaming? It’s what nonprofits call “wrap-around services.” Someone in need may ask for food, but good organizations work to help them with job training, childcare, affordable housing, clothing.

Super Bowl commercials were memes before memes were trendy.

For the biggest spectacle in US sports, that means pre-game shows, team merch, player bios, coaches, and refs, instant replays, slo-mo, music, cheerleaders, celebrities, post-game analysis, and usually intriguing …. COMMERCIALS!

 

Key points include:

  • Brands joining the bandwagon
  • The broad and enduring appeal of the Super Bowl
  • What’s different about Super Bowl 55

 

Read the full article, Big Brands Redirect Super Bowl Ad Budgets to Accelerate COVID Recovery, on CorporateHartz.com.

 

Show Me Your Underwear – And Other Brand Marketing Tactics

 

In this concise but valuable post, Susan Meier explains how looking at a brand through the lens of empathy can inform and build strong brand relationship marketing strategies.

Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. It’s putting yourself in their shoes. And it’s the key to good branding, because the brand relationship is built on understanding the customer’s world view and desires. 

Hey, you got a lock?

Would you make a key and then run around looking for a lock to open?

To make good products and services, you’ve got to think first about how they’re going to be used and care about the people who’ll be using them. 

Draw a small circle.

You can’t be all things to all people. Whom can you best serve? Draw the circle as small as you can – that’s called your minimum viable audience. Identifying who’s in and who’s out will save you a lot of effort in both product development and marketing.

Once you’ve identified that specific group, you’ll want to find out: What do they care about? What makes them tick? What are their aspirations? Because knowing your audience and what’s important to them is critical to building your brand.

Show me your underwear.

Ask your customers these questions. Listen mindfully and humbly. Get to know them as human beings.

Better yet, observe them in their natural habitat. I have crisscrossed suburbia taking photographs of peoples’ bookshelves. I’ve spent hours watching college students shop online. I’ve grocery shopped with moms and hit the dog run with dog owners. And I’ve had scores of women show me their lingerie drawers.

 

Key points include:

  • Beginning with brand purpose
  • Identifying brand benefit story
  • Drawing brand boundaries

 

Read the full post, Choose Empathy, on SusanMeierStudio.com.

 

Free Webinar on Key Marketing Strategies

 

Start the year armed with a strong marketing strategy. Kaihan Krippendorff shares a short post on successful marketing campaigns and introduces his webinar on strategies to become agile and win customers through proximity.

TONY HSIEH’S STRATEGIC PATTERN

As many of you know, we recently said goodbye to an amazing leader, former CEO of Zappos, Tony Hsieh. We learned many lessons from Tony, the most important one being that the key question in strategy is to ask, “What business are we really in?” On Zappos’ success, he told us, “We were doing pretty well as a shoe company, but our growth really took off when we realized we’re a customer service company that happens to sell shoes.”

Keep reading to discover three free resources to help you answer this essential question and set your 2021 strategy.

Peter Drucker highlighted this principle when he said, “‘What is our business?’ is almost always a difficult question which can be answered only after hard thinking and studying. And the right answer is anything but obvious.”

Strategy comes down to finding the answer and making decisions consistent with what business you are in. I give more examples in this free webinar.

HOW MICROBREWERIES GET CUSTOMERS TO DRIVE 100 MILES

This year my family spent Thanksgiving in Louisiana. During the trip, a friend from home asked me to pick up some of his favorite beer from a microbrewery a couple hours outside of the city. I found myself journeying past swamps, farms, and alligators to visit the brewery and fulfill his request.

 

Key questions addressed in the webinar are:

  • What business are we really in? 
  • What need will make customers drive 100 miles? 
  • How can we win by delivering value closer to customers?

 

Read the full post, What Microbreweries, “Micro-factories”, And The Late Tony Hsieh Can Teach Us About Creating Our 2021 Strategy, and access the link to the free webinar at Kaihan.net.

 

The Key to Maximizing Brand Marketing

 

Toopan Bagchi identifies the importance of  building segmented brand management teams to maximize marketing capabilities and effectiveness.  

In a continuously disrupted landscape, many retailers are realizing the potential for private brands to not only improve margins, but to also attract customers, build baskets and drive loyalty. However, given retail’s traditional reliance on CPG companies to develop and cultivate brands, capabilities around true brand management are often limited. 

Retailers leaning in on private brands would be wise to establish and elevate brand management capabilities to improve the likelihood of success of any private brand strategy by establishing a clear and coherent brand architecture, identifying white space opportunities, developing brand platforms, creating and launching product, and sustaining brand health over time. Retailers such as Target are recognizing this and establishing brand management teams to oversee the portfolio of private brands, define strategies and lead execution.

 

Information in this article includes:

  • Picking the team
  • Setting up brand architecture
  • Launching brands

 

Read the full article, Keys to building a private brand management team, on the Storebrands website.