Business Model

Welcoming new member Cathrine Cornella

Umbrex is pleased to welcome Cathrine Cornella. Cathrine focuses on the circular economy in Switzerland and transitioning businesses to a less resource-intensive and more circular business model. Most recently, she spent a couple of years working in various organizations in Malawi (Southern Africa) and Switzerland on sustainable agricultural supply chains, economic empowerment of farmers and young people, and development projects.

Initially, she worked with McKinsey and as an independent consultant focusing on strategy and operational efficiency in financial services, telecommunication and other sectors.

Cathrine lives in Zurich, Switzerland, with her husband and two kids and likes to explore the beautiful Swiss Alps hiking, rock climbing or back country skiing. Cathrine is happy to support on projects aimed to transition to a more circular economy or business model and related to resource optimization.

Changes: Is it Time to Adopt a Multi-track Career Model for Your Business?

 

To ensure companies have the talent that will grow the business, Stephen Redwood explains how a multi-track career model is the better choice for today’s agile and lean requirements.

In a world where attracting top talent is increasingly competitive there is certainly a case for focusing attention on that special and small number of company roles that are deemed critical to success. Those roles may well shape the agenda, define points of focus, and be responsible for creating much of the potential business value, but it is important not to lose sight of the fact that it is the collective performance of the whole employee population that ultimately delivers the actual results. In thinking of a suitable metaphor, I was reminded of the poem Where Many Rivers Meet by David Whyte. The title conjured just the right image for the way career models should combine the flow of capabilities across organizations to support strategic goals and individual ambitions alike with a force like ‘the mouths of the rivers sing[ing] into the sea.’

The narrowly defined career paths of the past, that reward climbing a hierarchy of increasingly administrative general management roles, no longer fit with the leaner, agility-focused, diverse and dispersed operations of today’s companies. Nor do they fit with the expectations of an increasingly mobile, diverse, remote and ‘gig-minded’ talent pool of today’s society. More flexible career paths are the order of the day, yet in many cases the need lags behind the reality.

 Clients often ask me what they should factor into their thinking as they evolve new designs that allow for multiple career paths, providing opportunities for a wide range of skill sets and capabilities.

 

Key points include:

  • Addressing the practical realities of the global labor market
  • Balancing individual and organizational needs
  • Offering different career tracks

 

Read the full article, Where Many Rivers Meet – Building Multi-Track Career Models That Work, on LinkedIn.