corporate storytelling

How to Tell a Story Well – A Story that Will Engage, Connect, and Sell

January 22, 2021

 

Susan Meier shares an always-relevant post on storytelling that explains why brevity, honesty, and making it memorable are key components of a good story well told. 

There’s a passage from the childhood classic One Fish Two Fish, Red Fish Blue Fish that I personally consider to be the best story ever told:

‘My hat is old, my teeth are gold.

I have a bird I like to hold.

My shoe is off, my foot is cold.

My shoe is off, my foot is cold.

I have a bird I like to hold.

My hat is old, my teeth are gold.

And now my story is all told.’

Good storytelling is a powerful thing. People don’t engage with products or data; they engage with stories. In the world of business, one of the best skills you can cultivate is how to tell a story well.

Here are 3 things that made Dr. Seuss such a captivating storyteller that you can add to your toolbox tomorrow:

 

Key tips include:

  • Choosing five key points
  • Finding the truth in the story
  • How to use repetition

 

Read the full article, 3 Reasons Dr Seuss Was A Genius Storyteller (And How You Can Be Too), on ChangeCreator.com.

 

Understanding the Why in Story

December 5, 2020

 

Jesse Jacoby shares a post that illustrates the importance of story, and why the corporate story is the key to engaging employees.

We all love a good story, whether our preference is for fiction or nonfiction.

It doesn’t matter if you’re reading a book, watching a movie, or listening to the news, expanding your mind watching a TEDx talk or listening to a podcast. All these media use stories to communicate their messages.

Why?

One reason is because it makes the message more interesting. We may miss the importance of a fact if the information is presented in a boring way; but when it is woven into a story, it can reveal a message that we otherwise would have missed.

 The best storytellers make us feel that we are part of narrative. They make us laugh because of the circumstances or cry by getting us to experience the emotion that the characters do.

And it doesn’t matter if the characters are portrayed as human beings or animals, as George Orwell’s Animal Farm so aptly illustrates. Kids as well as adults identify with them because they recognize something of themselves in them, and often they desire to become more like them.

Another reason stories are told is because people will often take action as a result. It is why the authors of many non-fiction books create personas. They want their readers to be able to easily identify and personalize the principles that they describe.

 

Key points in this article include:

  • The power of ‘why’
  • Motivating behaviour
  • Organizational stories

 

Read the full article, Why Stories Matter to Your Organization, on EmergentConsultants.com.