employee management

How to Realize the Potential of Human Resources

Stephen Redwood Thought Leadership
February 16, 2020

 

Stephen Redwood provides answers to commonly asked questions that help his clients increase the strategic value of Human Resources (HR).

If there is one thing that has been a constant over my years in HR and decades as a consultant, it has been the sense that the HR function is too often a supplicant to other functions and lacks the confidence to see itself as an equal. So, when clients ask me how they should be thinking about the evolution of their own HR function, in my mind is the question of how to overcome this mindset and establish a better understanding of how it can provide greater strategic value. 

With that said,Winston Churchill’s words “It is always wise to look ahead, but difficult to look further than you can see” resonate with a challenge that faces HR: people and cultures take time to change so, what exactly should one be changing to and with what timeframe in mind?

 

Questions covered in this article include:

  • Given no constraints, what is the most positively impactful contribution HR could make to the organization?
  • How can HR gain the “permission” and latitude to achieve its potential?
  • What should HR be working harder at?
  • How can HR gain sufficient agility to build and sustain a high impact contribution?

 

Read the full article, How Can We Increase the Strategic Value of HR?, on LinkedIn.

tags Business Growth, employee management, Human Resources

Talent, Culture, and Company

Sherif El-Henaoui Thought Leadership
February 6, 2020

 

It takes more than talent to become a valued employee in today’s workplace. Sherif El Henaoui identifies the benefits of finding the right fit. 

Top people are desired. Every company wants them: the intelligent, creative, endurable, high-performance worker. Since this desired workforce is rare, there is a “war” as suggested by the HR literature. I once heard a quote of a McKinsey partner commenting on the Internet bubble crisis saying, “We won the war for talent, but we ended up with too many prisoners.”

Cultural fit

We want to suggest a more peaceful view on the matter. High-performance is also a result of the cultural fit. This applies to societies and corporations. An aggressive, forward-looking sales professional works well in one type of company but is perceived as too pushy and less collegial in another. Is that the fault of the employee?

 

Read the full article, Fight Your Own War for Talent, on LinkedIn.

tags corporate culture, employee management, leadership

Sharing the Equity in Your Business

Mike Cox Thought Leadership
February 2, 2020

 

Mike Cox answers a question that is close to the heart of every business owner and entrepreneur who may be considering bringing new people into the business, “How much equity should I give a new hire.”

 

This question greys the hair of every business owner and entrepreneur. After all owners bear the burden of risk regardless of how they answer that question and the more that they choose to let go of equity, the less they feel like an owner and the more they feel like any other executive -except that they incurred a risk others didn’t.

While holding equity is fundamental to being a business owner, the distribution of equity from owners to employees is not fundamental and happens for a wide variety of reasons – some justified and others misguided. And while few employees would ever shun being given equity, their rationale for and level of interest in equity varies for many reasons.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Equity distribution, the tool of last resort
  • The appeal of equity to employees
  • Alignment of agendas

 

Read the full article, Don’t Give Equity away too Freely, on the Cox Innovations website.

tags business models., employee management, equity distribution