Inclusion

Key Discussion on Leading Change and Fostering Inclusion

 

Christy Johnson shares the results from a panel discussion at the 2020 Project Ascendance Summit on how to foster inclusion in schools and the workplace.

The panel addressed:

Getting past assumptions and misperceptions about diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)

Getting the best return on investment (ROI) possible with investments in DEI

Taking the right first steps toward inclusion

Asking questions from a place of humble inquiry

Getting Past Assumptions and Misperceptions About DEI

Michael Meotti, Executive Director of the Washington Student Achievement Council, said that WSAC is a cabinet-level state agency that deals with all sorts of higher education issues. It runs a number of initiatives, including the state’s financial aid programs, which are meant to increase participation and success in higher education. WSAC is helping more Washington residents get some kind of educational credential.

We don’t think enough about what it means for the college to be a student-ready environment, Meotti said, and we need to relentlessly scrutinize the data on how students are doing. If an educational organization keeps seeing racial and ethnic disparities in enrollment, along with disparities in student participation and success, the model is systemically racist. Changing models requires taking a deep dive into how you operate.”

 

Key points discussed include:

  • Changing systems and structures
  • The solutions illusion
  • Addressing systemic inequities in schools

 

Read the full article, How Revamping Systems and Asking the Right Questions Can Foster Inclusion in Schools and the Workplace, on ArtemisConnection.com. 

 

Marching towards Diversity and Inclusion

 

Surbhee Grover discusses diversity and inclusion and explains why solidarity is the key to forging a new paradigm of equality. 

The fashion industry saw one debacle after another in 2018-19 that demonstrated just how wide the gap is between how businesses should behave and how they do. In the recent past, Burberry, Gucci and Dolce & Gabbana have been hurt by adverse publicity highlighting their cultural insensitivity. 

Dolce & Gabbana’s “Eating with Chopsticks” commercials showed an Asian model trying to eat spaghetti with chopsticks. People called the ads disrespectful and racist, and the commercials were pulled within 24 hours. It was estimated that Dolce & Gabbana put ~$500 million (a third of its revenue) at risk as a result of the backlash. There have been many diagnoses offered (how did something so obviously offensive slip through the cracks of a diverse, global management team/ workforce?) and the general consensus has been that making strides in hiring for diversity doesn’t mean much if that diversity is not used effectively.

The last couple of years have seen diversity conversations expand to “Diversity and Inclusion”. But even as we fight for respect, religious sensitivities, representation on the Board, and the right to equal pay (for equal work), we might want to re-evaluate if this expansion is sufficient.

 

Read the full article, Making a Difference to Diversity Might Require us to Deviate from Existing Definitions, on the Thrive Global website.