Inspiring employees

Cost-effective Tips for the Pro-active Business Leader

 

Bernie Heine provides a few cost-effective ways to boost employee engagement, productivity, and loyalty.

Showing gratitude to employees is essential, and a good and easy way to do it is with employee incentives that don’t cost money.

A good business leader should reward the employees when they deserve it. However, the reason why they often shy away from it is that it costs money. While one could argue that losing valuable employees is more expensive, there’s a middle ground. There are ways to increase motivation in the workplace that are free. With these employee incentives that don’t cost money, business leaders can make their employees feel valuable without breaking the bank.

Reasons to provide employee incentives that don’t cost money

Having your business transferred without delays was easy with the right company by your side. But someone else also took the burden of your relocation – your faithful employees.

Even if no significant changes have happened, your employees might have been doing their best for a while now. Through rewards, you get to increase productivity and show them you value them. Furthermore, you’re setting an excellent example for other employees by showing what values are important to your company. And since it’s so easy to show appreciation with cost-free employee incentives, there’s no reason not to do it.

 

Key points include:

  • Certificates
  • Flexibility options
  • Communication

 

Read the full article, Employee Incentives That Don’t Cost Money, on the ProfessionalBusinessCoach.com.

 

What’s the Purpose of Your Strategic Plan?

February 22, 2020

 

Geoff Wilson gets straight to the point with some tough love in this article by asking if you to make sure your strategy inspires. 

The possibilities are endless.  Some might say that the sole purpose is to ‘enhance shareholder value.’  I’d argue that this old trope is no longer the gold standard. Some adhere to the stakeholder model…which might be closer.  Regardless of the ‘concept,’ a given business strategy has to appeal to a lot of people.

Strategy, inasmuch as it deals with things that are less certain and immediate, is an argument.  It’s an argument formed from assumptions that are (or should be) formed from knowable facts and less knowable (but educated) estimates.

But, something tends to happen on the way to building business strategies that derails one of the most important imperatives.  We lose the power of inspiration. Usually, we lose it when the hardcore management nerds get ahold of the strategic planning and implementation ‘ecosystem’ and start over whelming the organization with jargon, tools, and really smart pablum.

 

Read the full article, Are your people uninspired? Maybe it’s time to hang the DJ., on the Wilson Growth Partners website.