Remote Work

Thinking Forward to the Future of Work

February 9, 2021

 

Paul Millerd shares insights from multiple sources on the future of work in these five conversations. 

The future of work can mean anything.  I’ve had many conversations and discussions around the idea of “future of work” where people talk past each other, often focused on different fundamental issues.  In an effort to make sense of this complexity and create some common ground for the many people having these conversations, I propose differentiating between five future of work conversations:

Conversation #1: Macro Trends (consultancies, journalists, politicians)

This conversation is typified by looking at trends and then working backward to see what the implications are for people.  Terms like “fourth industrial revolution,” “the end of work,” “post-work,” “artificial intelligence,” and “robots” are used prolifically.  McKinsey writes in a report on the future of work:

‘Automation, digital platforms, and other innovations are changing the fundamental nature of work.’

…and Quartz:

‘Automation, advanced manufacturing, AI, and the shift to e-commerce are dramatically changing the number and nature of work.’

…and finally, The Brookings Institute:

‘Robots, artificial intelligence, and driverless cars are no longer things of the distant future.’

 

Key points include:

  • One of the top three skills workers will need
  • The Gig Economy
  • Evolving Organizational Ecosystems

 

Read the full article, The Future Of Work Is Five Different Conversations, on LinkedIn.

 

How to Maximize the Workshop Experience

 

Jonathan Paisner shares a video from his #be150 series on conducting an in-person work session.

 

 

Key points include:

  • Planning
  • Appreciating the novelty
  • Working those interstitial moments

 

Catch the full video, Running a workshop in the time of COVID, on BrandExperienced.com.

 

Resources to Boost Pandemic Productivity 

 

Christy Johnson provides two valuable resources with reviews of tools to help guide your team through the current pandemic situation and maintain productivity, boost morale, and ensure effective communication.

 

The internet is saturated with ‘remote work tips and tricks,’ ’10 ways to stay focused,’ ‘best home office tools and gear,’ and other guides to make remote work more productive. At Artemis Connection, we believe there is something missing: research-based tools to foster employee morale and effective team communication and collaboration. Through our focus groups and interviews, we have seen that companies who foster morale and an accepting culture outperform the competition. That’s why we’ve compiled our list of the top remote work tools to foster collaboration and effective communication.

 

And of course, if you’re interested in research-based tips to maximize your productivity as a remote organization, check out our Navigating the New World of Remote Work report.

 

Key points in the resources include:

  • Team communication tools
  • Tools to establish employee routines
  • Tools to show employee appreciation
  • How to make remote work work for you
  • Management considerations
  • How to innovate virtually
  • Logistical solutions

 

Read the full article, Tools to Foster Collaboration & Effective Communication Remotely, and access the links to the PDFs on Artemisconnection.com

 

Rethinking Our Way Forward into a New Work World

 

As the world begins to realize there will be no return to normal, Diane Mulcahy shares an article that explores the need to rethink the future of work.

Work was ripe for disruption long before 2020. The fundamental structure of work, and the ways we work, haven’t kept pace with technology, with corporate needs to access the right talent at the right time, or with workers’ preferences for greater flexibility and control.

Now that it’s been disrupted – now that how and where and when we work has all fundamentally changed – we aren’t likely to revert to the way we used to work. There is no return to normal.

Abandoning the idea that we’re going back, and backwards, to our old working lives opens up a whole new set of possibilities and opportunities about ways to move forward. It offers us the chance to rethink what work will look like, not return to what it was.

Rethinking Work

Companies have traditionally organized the work they need to get done into full-time jobs, which they then fill with full-time employees. Full-time jobs aren’t going away, but they are being supplemented by a more flexible, dynamic approach to structuring work into projects, assignments, and tasks.

 

Points covered in this article include:

  • Breaking jobs into more precise and specific units
  • Moving past the idea of an office-based workplace
  • Workforce as a service (WaaS)

 

Read the full article, We Need to Rethink Normal, Not Return to It, on ADP.com.

 

Work at Home Tips to Stay Motivated and Productive

 

If you struggle to stay motivated when working from home, this post is for you. Jeremy Greenberg shares an article that explores the cons of working at home, and what you can do to improve your performance all by yourself. 

Tens of millions of us — two thirds of all American full-time workers — are now working from home. This often means we’ve had little direct supervision or oversight in months, away from our colleagues’ (and our boss’s) watchful eye.

That may feel nice… but data shows that we perform better when we know we’re being observed. For example, in a study of 40,000 Virgin Atlantic flights conducted by the National Bureau of Economic Research, one group of captains was told that their fuel performance was being monitored, and the other group was not. The captains who knew they were being observed had better fuel efficiency throughout takeoff, flight, and landing. The principle that direct observation improves work performance is commonly known as the “Hawthorne effect.”

I’ve thought a lot about this lately, because I developed a podcast called Follow the Leader. I recorded a CEO during a pivotal moment in his business, and he later told me that the direct observation helped him focus. “I was more reflective and poised than I would have been having done this on my own,” said the CEO, Taymur Ahmad, of the company Actnano. Interesting! So how can we all gain that benefit, even if we don’t have a boss (or podcaster) watching?

 

Key points covered in this article include:

  • Add self-observation to your routine
  • Get an accountability partner
  • Go public

 

Read the full article, You Work Better When You’re Being Watched. Here’s How To Monitor Yourself, on Entrepreneur.com

 

A Positive Look Ahead Post COVID-19

September 7, 2020

 

Amanda Setili was recently interviewed by Colleen Francis  on LinkedIn Live where they discussed how the pandemic will improve certain areas of business for the employer, the employee, and the customer.

 

What a fun and thought provoking conversation with Colleen Francis today. We covered a lot of terrain, including:

– How having a diverse team makes you more resilient in the face of market upsets.

– 3 things you must do to maintain your team’s productivity and enthusiasm when times are tough.

– Six things that will improve as a result of the pandemic:

o How pricing will change

o Why customer-supplier relationships will change for the better

o What new business opportunities and white space will be created

o Why sales productivity and effectiveness will increase dramatically

o How video game companies will lead the way into new remote experiences for businesses.

o Why remote work is here to stay, and why it will improve our outcomes and lives.

– How comfort with uncertainty creates a lasting competitive advantage, now more than ever.

 

Catch the full interview, Six Things that may Change for the Better, on LinkedIn.