Strategy Management

Strategy Excavation on Consensus

 

In this article, Amanda Setili explains why it’s necessary to dig below the surface of agreement to avoid the issue of last-minute naysayers.

Imagine a high-level team whose members represent different stakeholders. It might include representatives from a wide range of disciplines, divisions, companies or even communities. At first, they are all enthusiastically working together to define a common path forward.

As “consensus” nears, some members quietly begin to lose their enthusiasm. They start to wonder whether the direction in which the team is headed is even close to their original expectations. Will the path ahead be worth the time and effort? Is this still a good idea?

Such doubts often linger in the background. They may surface occasionally as polite, perhaps understated questions. But if you are leading the team and the “consensus” view is close to your own, it’s easy to miss entirely growing undercurrents of doubt.

This is a pivotal moment. If you push ahead without searching for silent naysayers, you may greatly misjudge your team’s potential. Instead of having a fully committed team that can draw on the resources of numerous groups, what you actually have is a small number of backers and a lot of doubters.

 

Key points include:

  • Avoiding dissolution
  • Consensus testing
  • Setting an initial trial

 

Read the full post, How the Top Secret Concerns of Its Members Can Sink a Team, on LinkedIn. 

 

A Winning Strategy Management Resource

 

Access this resource from Gaelle Lamotte’s company on how to improve your ability to execute strategies by integrating development and planning, driving focus and alignment.

How often do you win with your strategy?

Strategy development is useful for defining ambitions and long term goals. A good strategy is only as good as the capability to implement it and how well it delivers the desired outcome.

Various research concludes:

Organisations on average realise only 50-63% of the financial performance promised by their strategies.

Others suggest that the figure is in fact less than 30%.

Regardless of the data reviewed, it is not good news!

Failure to execute is often a result of poor understanding, and disjointed planning and governance processes.

 

Key points include:

  • Identification of weak governance processes
  • Build in-house capability for aligning Operational Plans and Budget with the Strategy
  • The dynamic strategy management approach

 

Access the full PDF, Improve your ability to execute your strategies, from the Strategy Management Partners’ website.