team leadership

4 Steps that Will Help You Get Honest Feedback

Susan Drumm Thought Leadership
January 10, 2020
tags communication, Employee engagement, team leadership

Susan Drumm provides four steps to ensure you will get honest feedback from your team.

Do you think you can get your team to give you honest feedback? Like no-holds-barred honest?  

Many of my clients tell me they struggle to get real feedback from their direct reports and I’m not surprised.

Does this story sound familiar? One of my senior clients recently received the results of his 360 report and was surprised to learn that his team felt they weren’t being mentored effectively by him.

None too pleased with this, he walked out into the office and proceeded to go desk to desk. “Was this comment from you? Do YOU think I’m a good mentor? Do you have a problem with the way I mentor?”

 

Points covered in the four steps include:

-Create a culture of feedback and honesty from the outset.

-Dig in when asking for feedback.

-Be honest and genuine when asking for feedback

-Once you get the feedback, do something with it.

 

Read the full article, How to Get Honest Feedback from Your Team, on the Meritage Leadership website.

Master the Art of Strategy Execution

Gaelle Lamotte Thought Leadership
January 2, 2020
tags Business strategies, Strategy, team leadership

An evergreen post from Gaelle Lamotte to kickoff 2020 and help you prepare for what lies ahead. 

In a world of disruptive businesses, overwhelming information and relentless change, companies have to master the art of strategy execution to be agile enough to capitalize on growth opportunities. Excellence in execution is what makes the difference between good strategies and success in the marketplace for your customers, partners and employees, and ultimately investors and shareholders.

 

Points covered include:

-Understanding the organization’s capabilities

-Discipline in managing strategy

 

Read the full article, How do you prepare for what’s ahead?, on LinkedIn.

Six Questions to Find the Right Sponsor

Kaihan Krippendorff Thought Leadership
December 17, 2019
tags employee innovation, management, team leadership

To inspire successful innovation, Kaihan Krippendorff explains why the composition of the founding team is crucial and why the first step should be to find a sherpa. He provides six questions to help you assess and secure a powerful advocate to lead the team.

That historic moment when the perfect team unifies beyond an opportunity, pregnant with possibility, is the essential scene of any great innovation legend: think Jobs and Wozniak when they created Apple, Gates and Allen with Microsoft, or Page and Brin with Google.

This is why so many books and professors and venture capitalists focus on the composition of the founding team – you want more than one person but fewer than seven, the right mix of personality types (Roger Hamilton offers a useful framework), and a balance of skills (the hacker, hustler, and hipster).  But here is the problem. More than 70% of society’s most transformative innovations have come from employees, not entrepreneurs, and forming a team around an innovation idea as an employee is a fundamentally different challenge.

 

Read the full article, Your Innovation Needs a Sponsor… Here are 6 Signs You Have the Right One, on the Outthinker website.

How Do You Protect Your Top Talent?

Geoff Wilson Thought Leadership
December 11, 2019
tags company culture, management, team leadership

Geoff Wilson explains what Andrew Luck’s recent retirement from football should teach executives about protecting top talent.

If you are an organizational leader who is leaning on a few star talents surrounded by a supporting cast of also-rans to ‘gut it out’ on a daily basis, you are playing a very dangerous game. Because when your top talent has had enough–when you have extracted enough of their soul by asking them to jump on yet another grenade dropped by a poor performing organization–it will be fully justified to go elsewhere.

And, if you aren’t doing this explicitly, it might be good to take a moment and reflect on whether you are doing this implicitly.  Take a look at the team you lead and ask whether you are leaning a bit too heavily on a talented few.  Take a look at the organization you lead and ask whether you are counting too much on a few talented teams to carry the rest of the organization.

Do this not because you have the time to do it.  Nobody does.  Do it because you can’t afford to grind your top talent down to a joyless nub.

 

Read the full article, What Andrew Luck just taught us about protecting top talent, on Wilson Growth Partners’ website.

How to Create a Dynamically-Charged Team through Conflict

Susan Drumm Thought Leadership
December 9, 2019
tags leadership, team leadership

Susan Drumm identifies how conflict can achieve greater results when it grows from cognitive diversity and provides a few factors that can help you build a cognitively diverse team.

 

When you imagine an incredibly effective, successful team meeting, what does it look like?

For some people, it looks like this: One person talking while everyone nods. Someone is taking notes while muttering, ‘Yes, I think so too!’ The leader wraps the meeting by asking, ‘So we’re all in agreement?’ And everyone cheers, ‘Yes!’

Now, I love a smoothly run meeting as much as the next person, but I also know you do not want a completely conflict-free team. It’s not good for your company (or your clients or margins) to be staffed exclusively by people who share the same worldview, the same personality type, or the same approach to business.

In fact, every company would benefit from hiring for cognitive diversity — even if it creates conflict.

Why? Because the conflict that arises from cognitive diversity is good conflict.

It’s conflict that results in better products, happier customers, more effective systems, and fewer missteps.

 

Points covered in this article include:

-What cognitive diversity is

-Types of conflict that arise from cognitive diversity

-How to make sure you have a cognitively diverse team

 

Read the full article, Why You Need Cognitive Diversity on Your Team – Even if it Leads to Conflict, on the Meritage website.